An open refridgerator boasts a lot of space.
Courtesy of LG

3 Types of Refrigerators

Refrigerators come in three basic versions: freestanding, built-in, and under-counter. Which one you choose depends on space, aesthetics, and budget. You'll want to take a close look at available features. Think energy, too. Every refrigerator should come with an energy guide label that tells you just how that model rates.


A stainless steel refridgerator stands on its own.
Courtesy of Fridgidaire

Freestanding Models

Standard refrigerators measure from 27 to 32 inches deep, so they stand out from 24-inch-deep base cabinets.

Consider these features: number of shelves, humidity drawers, meat storage compartments, temperature controls, defrosting method, ice-maker and water dispenser, convenience door, and energy-saving devices such as a power-saver switch.


The refrigerator blends in with the black cabinets of the kitchen.
Courtesy of SubZero

Built-ins

Gaining in popularity are relatively expensive 24-inch-deep built-ins, which fit right into a standard run of cabinets. Most models offer inter-changeable door panels to match surrounding cabinet doors. Others flaunt the "commercial" look, matching stainless steel with glass doors.

Because these units have compressor and condenser units mounted on top, they don't require dust-gathering gaps for ventilation; they also can be cleaned and serviced in place. One minus (besides the high price) is the relatively shallow interior.


This small refrigerator fits under the counter.
Courtesy of SubZero

Under-Counter

Standard under-counter refrigerators, traditional choices for very small kitchens or separate entertainment areas, are 33 to 34 inches high, 18 to 57 inches wide, and 25 to 32 inches deep, with a 2.5- to 6-cubic-foot capacity.


This closed two-door refrigerator has easy access, but narrow shelves.
Courtesy of LG

Side-by-Side

Popular two- or three-door, side-by-side refrigerator/freezers permit easy visibility and access to food, but their relatively narrow shelves make it difficult to store bulky items. Their opposing door swings can block countertop access on both sides.


This refrigerator has a freezer on the bottom for easy access.
Courtesy of GE

Bottom Freezer

Other double-door models have the freezer positioned at the unit's bottom or top. The bottom-mount design has a handy freezer pullout drawer and makes it easier to reach the more often used refrigerator section. The top-mount style comes in the greatest number of sizes and options.


This refrigerator has one door open and lots of space.
Courtesy of SubZero

How Big A Fridge Do You Need?

As a rule of thumb, figure 8 cubic feet of refrigerator space for two people; add 1 cubic foot for each additional family member, and 2 extra cubic feet if you entertain frequently. A refrigerator runs best when it isn't stuffed to the gills.

Two cubic feet per person is the rule for a freezer compartment.



Printed From:
http://www.myhomeideas.com/specials/kitchens/guide-refrigerators